Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Motivating factors in the benevolent treatment of slaves in the antebellum South
by FitzHenry, Wendy, M.A., California State University, Dominguez Hills, 2007, 93; 1445147
Abstract (Summary)

In the antebellum South, American slavery was a well-organized system of coercion and exploitation regarded by many as necessary for the economic prosperity of the South and the nation as a whole. However, some owners chose to show their slaves kindness and benevolence. The motivations behind these actions were complex and not necessarily benign in nature. This study makes use of both primary and secondary sources pertaining to the owners' motivations and the slaves' interpretations of such actions. Results are presented in chapters on (1) the characteristics of antebellum slavery and the many motivations behind benevolent treatment of slaves by their owners, including (2) societal pressures, (3) paternalism, (4) miscegenation, (5) desire for psychological manipulation, (6) personal morals or belief systems, and (7) economics; and (8) conclusions.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Feuer, Bryan
Commitee:
School: California State University, Dominguez Hills
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 46/01M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: African Americans, Black history, American history
Keywords:
Publication Number: 1445147
ISBN: 978-0-549-10213-7
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