Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Level of *construal and the ideal self: Implications for attraction and support provision
by Langsam, Karen L., Ph.D., State University of New York at Stony Brook, 2007, 55; 3334941
Abstract (Summary)

The current work explores how level of action construal (i.e., construing action in abstract, purpose-oriented terms relative to concrete, process-oriented terms) influences whether interpersonal attraction and social-support provision are experienced as pertinent to one’s important self-ideals. Across four experiments, temporal distance influenced how pertinent individuals’ own ideal self-views (i.e., ideal goals, traits, values, and preferences) were to their feelings of attraction toward various targets, their evaluations of support provision situations, and their anticipated experiences during support provision to a close other. Participants thinking about events in the distal future, relative to participants thinking about events in the proximal future, were more attracted to and felt more positively toward individuals emulating their own ideals (Experiments 1 and 3), viewed support as more appropriate when in accordance with their ideal support preferences (Experiment 2), and associated their anticipated comfort and emotions expected during an upcoming support provision interaction involving a close other more strongly with their overall support provision preferences (Experiment 4). Proposed implications for interpersonal attraction and for ameliorating discordant social support among close others are discussed.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor:
Commitee:
School: State University of New York at Stony Brook
School Location: United States -- New York
Source: DAI-B 69/10, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social psychology
Keywords: Abstract and concrete construals, Attraction, Construal, Ideal self, Interpersonal attraction, Level of action construal, Social support provision, Support provision
Publication Number: 3334941
ISBN: 978-0-549-87834-6
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