Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Texas public elementary schoolteachers' knowledge and attitudes toward homeless students
by Cartner, James Corde, Ed.D., University of Phoenix, 2007, 191; 3353757
Abstract (Summary)

This study focused on the professional knowledge levels of the McKinney-Vento legislation and teaching attitudes toward homeless students among elementary schoolteachers in four Texas public schools. The four elementary schools used in this study are located in west and central Texas. The purpose of this research was to determine the degree to which professional knowledge of the McKinney-Vento legislation affect teaching attitudes toward homeless students among elementary schoolteachers in four Texas public schools. A cross-sectional survey was created to survey 87 Texas-certified elementary schoolteachers. Based on an exhaustive review of the literature, both teacher knowledge and attitudes of homelessness were identified to influence homeless student teaching strategies. Descriptive statistical analysis reflected that the majority of teachers in this study had substantial knowledge of the McKinney-Vento legislation and positive attitudes toward homeless students. However, correlational statistics indicated that a positive correlation did not exist between teachers’ level of knowledge of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act Subtitle VII-B and their attitudes toward homeless students.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Barbosa, Tamara
Commitee:
School: University of Phoenix
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-A 70/04, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational tests & measurements, Elementary education, Public policy
Keywords: Elementary teachers, Homeless, Homeless education, Knowledge and attitude measurement, McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, Teacher training, Texas, Texas public education
Publication Number: 3353757
ISBN: 978-1-109-10470-7
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