Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

A phenomenological exploration of deaf and hard-of-hearing technicians' perceptions of communication technologies
by Batten-Mickens, Meloyde ReNey, D.M., University of Phoenix, 2007, 515; 3299229
Abstract (Summary)

This qualitative, phenomenological study, utilized a modified van Kaam method (Moustakas, 1994), to understand the perceptions, lived experiences, and social realities of organizational accommodations for 15 deaf and hard-of-hearing technology workers at Gallaudet University. The data were collected using transcribed, semi-structured interviews, and assessed with NVivo 7 software. The research question, to what extent are accommodation and socialization, reflected by workplace electronic communication technologies, affecting worker productivity and satisfaction, determined that available communication technology increased satisfaction, socialization, and productivity for the participants. The findings suggest that as transformational participative organizational leaders implement ADA rules, increase deaf awareness, and provide communication access, deaf and hard-of-hearing workers will have the appropriate accommodations to facilitate successful socialization and productive work interactions.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor:
Commitee:
School: University of Phoenix
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-A 69/01, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Management, School administration, Developmental psychology
Keywords: Communication technologies, Deaf, Electronic technology, Email, Hard-of-hearing, IM, Organizational accommodations, Technicians, Video
Publication Number: 3299229
ISBN: 9780549430964
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