Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

An examination of the relationship between gender, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and SAT performance
by St. Rose, Andresse, Ed.D., The George Washington University, 2008, 118; 3325308
Abstract (Summary)

This study examined the relationship between gender, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and SAT math and verbal performance among college-bound seniors in 2004. Although a great deal of research has examined how gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status are each related to academic performance, there is a dearth of literature that looks at all three variables simultaneously to identify possible interrelationships between them.

Specifically, multiple regression was used to examine if significant moderator effects existed between gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Although there was evidence of significant moderator effects between these variables, they were weak compared to the separate main effects of gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Hence, the results support the main effects model. Race/ethnicity explained a larger portion of the variance in SAT math and verbal scores than either gender or socioeconomic status. Altogether, gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status explained about 10% and 16% of the variance in verbal and math SAT performance, respectively.

Future research investigating moderator effects should include additional factors known to affect student performance.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: El-Khawas, Elaine
Commitee: Rotberg, Iris C., Yen, Cherng-Jyh
School: The George Washington University
Department: Educational Administration and Policy Studies
School Location: United States -- District of Columbia
Source: DAI-A 69/08, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational tests & measurements, Ethnic studies, Higher education
Keywords: Ethnicity, Gender, Interaction effects, Race, Race/ethnicity, SAT, Socioeconomic status
Publication Number: 3325308
ISBN: 9780549790808
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