Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Blue Hayes: An analysis of the performance style of jazz saxophonist Tubby Hayes
by Orgill, Edward Roy, D.A., University of Northern Colorado, 2008, 117; 3318427
Abstract (Summary)

This project is a descriptive analysis of the Jazz Saxophone performance style of mid 20th century British jazz saxophonist Tubby (Edward Brian) Hayes (1935–1973). Hayes represents the finest of European jazz saxophonists during the late 1950s and 1960s. He was the first British jazz saxophonist with ability equal to his American contemporaries, and he helped lay the foundation on which the strength of jazz in Europe during the latter part of the 20th century was built. This analysis focuses on the performance of Tubby Hayes during two consecutive 1961 recording sessions that took place in New York City during his first trip to the United States. At this time, Hayes was in top form as a jazz saxophonist, and performing with an American rhythm section more accustomed to accompanying virtuosic saxophonists than rhythm sections found in the United Kingdom. Hayes's brilliant performance, strong contributions from trumpeter Clark Terry, pianist Horace Parlan, bassist George Duvivier, drummer Dave Bailey and vibraphonist Eddie Costa as well as excellent production quality resulted in an album that is one of the strongest jazz recordings from the period, Tubbs in New York, re-released in 1990 under the new title Tubby Hayes with Clark Terry: The New York Sessions. This analysis is based on and includes complete transcriptions of four contrasting tracks, "You for Me," "Airegin," "Pint of Bitter" and "Soon."

Indexing (document details)
Advisor:
Commitee:
School: University of Northern Colorado
School Location: United States -- Colorado
Source: DAI-A 69/06, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Music
Keywords: British jazz, England, Hayes, Tubby, Jazz, Jazz transcription, Performance style, Saxophone, Style analysis
Publication Number: 3318427
ISBN: 9780549677673
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest