Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Diet formulation and manufacturing technique interactions affect pellet quality and broiler growth
by Buchanan, Nancy P., Ph.D., West Virginia University, 2008, 89; 3326469
Abstract (Summary)

The majority of broilers are fed pelleted diets. Feeding pelleted diets results in an improvement in weight gain and feed conversion compared to feeding mash diets. However, improvements in performance are contingent upon pellet quality. Manipulation of diet formulation and manufacturing technique has been associated with pellet quality changes. However, the interaction between the two factors is rarely explored. The objectives of this series of research were (1) to explore the main effects and interactions that occur when small inclusions of fiber, protein, and moisture are added to a corn-soybean based diets; and (2) to explore the main effects and interactions that occur when variation in diet formulation is coupled with variation in manufacturing technique. Increasing inclusions of supplemental protein (soybean meal) and moisture (tap water) improved pellet quality. Increasing inclusions of supplemental fiber (oat hulls) was detrimental to pellet quality. A diet formulation x manufacturing technique interaction was observed. Pellet quality was improved when a diet formulation containing increased inclusions of protein and moisture was manufactured using thin die and fast production rate. Pellet quality also improved when the same diet was manufactured using a thick die and fast production rate but to a lesser degree. Broilers were then fed treatments that varied in pellet quality. Changes in pellet quality were obtained by manipulation of diet formulation and manufacturing technique. Broilers fed a diet formulation containing increased inclusions of protein and moisture were larger than broilers fed a least-cost diet formulation. Broilers fed either diet manufactured using a thick die and slow production yielded the same amount of boneless skinless breast meat. However, broilers fed the diet formulation containing increased inclusions of protein and moisture manufactured using a thin die and a fast production rate yielded more boneless skinless breast meat than broilers fed a least-cost diet formulation manufactured using the same technique. These data demonstrate that diet formulation and manufacturing technique are, in fact, linked. Poultry integrators must consider both factors when attempting to optimize pellet quality and maximize meat production.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Moritz, Joseph S.
Commitee:
School: West Virginia University
School Location: United States -- West Virginia
Source: DAI-B 69/08, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Animal sciences
Keywords: Antibiotics, Broiler growth, Broilers, Diet formulation, Pellet quality, Poultry
Publication Number: 3326469
ISBN: 978-0-549-79008-2
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