Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

African American nursing students' perceptions of the NCLEX-RN© examination experience
by Green, Sheila P., Ph.D., University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 2008, 184; 3339176
Abstract (Summary)

This qualitative research study explored the perceptions of African American baccalaureate nursing students as they prepared for and completed their NCLEX-RN© examination experiences. Thirteen study participants were included in this inquiry. Four informants participated in the one-time focus group session and the remaining nine informants participated in the individual interviews. Two dominant themes were identified through the informants’ perspectives: (1) Professional entry into practice, and (2) Achievement of personal goals. Five supporting themes were also identified and included: (1) The preparation process for the NCLEX-RN© examination; (2) Mentoring and the importance of minority faculty presence; (3) Family support throughout nursing education and the NCLEX-RN© experience; (4) Spirituality; and (5) Race and persistence. The informants identified the NCLEX-RN© examination experience as a requirement necessary to gain entry to professional practice and viewed it as a means to an end. Their responses suggested that the NCLEX-RN© examination was an individualized experience. Preparation for the NCLEX-RN© examination required both individualized and customized approaches to address the needs of the test candidates.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Miller, Nancy
Commitee: Bickel, Beverly, Johantgen, Meghan, Rothstein, William, Rubinstein, Robert
School: University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Department: Public Policy
School Location: United States -- Maryland
Source: DAI-B 69/12, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Health education, Nursing
Keywords: African-Americans, Baccalaureate education, NCLEX-RN examination, Nursing students, Perceptions of NCLEX-RN exam, Qualitative research
Publication Number: 3339176
ISBN: 978-0-549-94831-5
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