Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The relationship between Christian literature and executive leader performance
by Mosher, Leslie, D.B.A., University of Phoenix, 2008, 397; 3348684
Abstract (Summary)

No known studies relate Christian literature to executive leader job performance. The following research question was raised: Is there a relationship between Christian literature and executive leader performance? This study is, therefore, of concern to five theoretical areas: Christian literature, self-directed learning, the transactional theory of reader-response, transfer of learning, and spiritual growth. This quantitative, correlational research employs a survey instrument to determine if a relationship exists by testing the null hypothesis: There is no relationship between Christian literature and executive leader performance. The entire population of executive leaders who are Christian Booksellers Association members are included in this investigation. As a result of the hypothesis test, the null hypothesis is rejected and the correlation between the mean number of books read annually and the full scale performance mean is considered to have a zero to weak significance, r(250) = .1998, p < .01. Recommendations for future research include understanding whether or not Christian literature contains content useful for executive leader responsibilities in the organizational environment.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Toney, Frank
Commitee:
School: University of Phoenix
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-A 70/02, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Religion, Management, Literacy, Reading instruction
Keywords: Adult learning, Christian, Executive leader, Leader, Performance, Reading, Spiritual growth
Publication Number: 3348684
ISBN: 978-1-109-04467-6
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest