Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

A quasi-experimental study of the relationship between school structure and student outcomes
by Chavez, Theresa Marie, Ed.D., University of Phoenix, 2008, 177; 3339938
Abstract (Summary)

Over 34% of high school students in Arizona failed the reading, writing, and mathematics portions of the state assessment exams in 2004. Leaders in education have suggested that restructuring schools into small learning communities or schools-within-a-school models could increase the quality of education. The purpose of the quantitative, matched group, quasi-experimental study was to determine if student outcomes differ depending on school structure. Chi-square statistical tests and t-tests were conducted to analyze the difference between pretest and post-test outcomes. The sample included eight schools in Tucson, AZ. A relationship could not be described between student outcomes and school structure due to a statistically significant difference among the feeder schools’ exam scores. The presence of a difference in student assessment outcomes at the feeder middle schools indicated a statistically significant difference among student assessment outcomes within the sample population prior to the treatment of school structure at the high schools in the study. The findings indicate that the evaluation of the effect of the treatment of school structure may be affected by the quality of skill acquisition demonstrated at the feeder middle school.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Collett, April
Commitee:
School: University of Phoenix
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-A 69/12, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational administration, Secondary education
Keywords: House structure, School structure, Schools-within-a-school, Small learning communities, Small schools reform, Smaller learning communities, Structure and assessment, Student outcomes
Publication Number: 3339938
ISBN: 978-0-549-93895-8
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