Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Identifying predictors of success for the computerized NCLEX-RN in associate degree nursing graduates
by Kline, Tina Marie, M.S.N., Northern Kentucky University, 2010, 53; 1475239
Abstract (Summary)

Failure of the NCLEX-RN is a significant problem with a farther reaching impact than just the individual student and program of nursing. Every student who is unsuccessful on the exam is one less registered nurse to provide patient care; therefore, increasing NCLEX-RN pass rates is essential to addressing the ongoing nursing shortage. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship among nursing curriculum grade point average, performance in the biological science courses, performance in the theory portion of fundamentals and medical-surgical nursing courses, performance on the Assessment Technologies Institute RN comprehensive predictor examination, and role transition setting and success on the NCLEX-RN examination. Approval was obtained from the governing institution and community college's internal review board, to conduct a record review of the graduating nursing classes. Logistical regression was then performed to identify significant predictors of NCLEX success, including ACT and COMPASS reading scores, biological science GPA, performance in medical-surgical nursing courses, and ATI comprehensive predictor performance. Statistical analysis indicated that ACT/COMPASS reading scores, nursing curriculum and biological science GPA, and ATI comprehensive predictor performance were significant predictors of NCLEX-RN performance.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Anderson, Margaret
Commitee: Wise, Gail
School: Northern Kentucky University
Department: Nursing
School Location: United States -- Kentucky
Source: MAI 48/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Community college education, Nursing, Higher education
Keywords: NCLEX-RN
Publication Number: 1475239
ISBN: 9781109727517
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