Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Identifying personal factors associated with participation in community walking following stroke
by Robinson, Cynthia A., Ph.D., University of Washington, 2010, 139; 3406040
Abstract (Summary)

Objective. The purposes of this dissertation were to: (1) examine the association between subjective and objective measures of participation in community walking; and (2) examine the association between personal factors and participation in community walking.

Design. Cross-sectional.

Setting. Ambulatory clinic and community.

Participants. Fifty community-dwelling survivors of stroke age 50-79.

Interventions. Not applicable.

Main outcome measures. Participants provided health status information. Participation in community walking was measured using self-report (number of trips and walking-related activities reported prospectively over a 7 day period) and step data (pedometer data collected prospectively over a 7 day period). Personal factors (age, sex, number of co-morbidities, fatigue, depression, self-efficacy related to balance and falls, and importance) were assessed. The association between subjective and objective measures of participation was analyzed using Pearson correlation. The association of personal factors with measures of participation was analyzed using multiple linear regression.

Results. Participation in community walking is very important to and reduced among survivors of stroke. Subjective and objective measures of participation related to community walking are only weakly associated. Self-efficacy was the only personal factor that was strongly associated with both subjective and objective measures of participation. Personal factors explained 31-53% (p < 0.01 for all) of the variability in participation in community walking.

Conclusions. Personal factors are associated with subjective and objective measures of participation, and explain more of the variability in community walking following stroke than physical factors (Robinson et al., 2007) or environmental factors (Matsuda et al., 2007) alone or in combination (Robinson and Matsuda, 2007). It is likely a combination of physical, environmental, and personal factors that explain variability in community walking following stroke. Due to the weak association between subjective and objective measures of participation, it is important to measure both.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Kartin, Debbie
Commitee:
School: University of Washington
School Location: United States -- Washington
Source: DAI-B 71/04, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Physical therapy, Occupational Therapy, Kinesiology
Keywords: Community walking, Poststroke, Stroke
Publication Number: 3406040
ISBN: 9781109724509
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