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Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Moms Aren't People: Constructing a Theory of Maternal Objectification
by Neff, Taylor C., Ph.D., Biola University, 2021, 226; 28412102
Abstract (Summary)

This grounded theory study draws on sexual objectification theory (Frederickson & Roberts, 1997) to identify and describe a theory of maternal objectification. Thirty mothers, each with an eldest child between the ages of 2 and 10 years old raised in a two- parent household were interviewed about their experiences of the expectations and pressures that were placed on them when they took on the role of mother. Through the grounded theory analysis of data, a theory emerged of women’s experience of motherhood as a role by which they become objectified. This model consists of four major components that describe the theory of maternal objectification: (a) the exposure to expectations that determine the desirable qualities of the objectified person; (b) the mechanisms by which mothers experience objectification; (c) the product of maternal objectification; and (d) the consequences of maternal objectification. These emergent components describe a theory of maternal objectification which involves experiences of objectification by others as well as self-objectification.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Hall, Elizabeth L.
Commitee: Anderson, Tamara L., Kim, Christina L.
School: Biola University
Department: Rosemead School of Psychology
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 82/10(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Psychology, Womens studies, Gender studies
Keywords: Intensive mothering ideology, Motherhood, Objectification, Women, Sexual objectification, Maternal objectification
Publication Number: 28412102
ISBN: 9798597069586
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