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Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Teachers’ Perceptions of What Motivates Them to Pursue Professional Development: A Case Study
by Norton, Florencia, Ed.D., Concordia University Irvine, 2021, 153; 28317018
Abstract (Summary)

This qualitative single-subject case study investigated teachers’ perceptions of what motivates them to pursue professional development. The research focused on one school district in New Jersey with participants from elementary, middle, and high schools. The district administrator in charge of professional development was also interviewed. Individual interviews and district professional development catalogs were used to collect data. This study identified factors that motivate teachers to engage in professional development, which include student achievement, compensation, past experiences, and collaboration. The study explored current research about motivation and best practices in professional development and sought to determine which components are the strongest motivation in the pursuit of professional growth. The conclusions drawn from this study were that teachers are motivated to pursue professional development when it benefits their students, provides them with resources and materials, values their time, and allows them to identify a need for and choose their programs.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Collins, Deborah
Commitee: Tarbutton, Tanya, Bryant, Jennifer
School: Concordia University Irvine
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 82/8(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Teacher education, Educational leadership
Keywords: Motivation, Professional development, Programs, Student achievement
Publication Number: 28317018
ISBN: 9798569995233
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