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Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Examining the Influence of Family and Social Support on Student Retention and Completion at Community Colleges
by Montgomery, Christy, D.E., University of Louisiana at Lafayette, 2019, 125; 13864073
Abstract (Summary)

Support is interpreted in various ways; however, the purpose of study is to examine the influence of family support and social support on student retention and completion at community colleges. This research explored the two means of support to point to best practices for student services administrators and personnel to more effectively assist students during their studies at a community college to increase retention and completion rates. This study has explored support that enhances the student experience, support that causes challenges for students, and areas of support students need but do not always have access to. It has been guided by the overarching research question: what types of family and social support do college students feel are most needed, beneficial, and impactful in their college success and degree completion?

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Olivier, Diane F.
Commitee: Cilesiz, Sebnem, Johnston, Ashley
School: University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Department: Educational Leadership
School Location: United States -- Louisiana
Source: DAI-A 82/8(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Higher education, Educational administration, Individual & family studies, Community college education, Educational leadership
Keywords: Family support, Student retention, Social support, Student completion rates, Student services, College success, Degree completion
Publication Number: 13864073
ISBN: 9798569963225
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