Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Teachers’ Perceptions of Technology Leadership that Impact Technology Use in the Classroom
by Fraser, Ross, Ed.D., Wilkes University, 2020, 219; 28156775
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this case study was to investigate K-12 teachers’ perceptions of technology leadership conditions that lead to successful technology integration at one particular school where professional development and technology are available and successful technology integration are known to have occurred. Technology integration and technology leadership conditions were considered using Mishra and Koehler’s (2006) Technological, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge (TPCK) framework as well as Puentedura’s (2013) Substitution, Augmentation, Modification and Redefinition (SAMR) model. Research questions sought to uncover the aspects of school leadership that influence teachers to use technology in the classroom, the learning opportunities that are currently provided to help teachers better understand how to use technology in the, and the new opportunities leadership might provide to help teachers better understand potential technology use in the classroom. The study involved interviews in a first round of data collection. After data analysis was conducted participants were asked a reflective question where they rated importance of themes that emerged. Results informed this school about what aspects of technology leadership have been perceived as effective, offered insights in terms of next steps for professional development as well as inform the field in general about possible effective practices.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Reinert, Paul
Commitee:
School: Wilkes University
Department: Educational Leadership
School Location: United States -- Pennsylvania
Source: DAI-A 82/7(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational leadership, Educational technology
Keywords: Coaching, Education, Integration, Technology
Publication Number: 28156775
ISBN: 9798557040518
Copyright © 2021 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest