Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Enculturated Captivity: The Ecopsychology of Collective Trauma
by Wilkins, Vaughan R., Ph.D., California Institute of Integral Studies, 2020, 195; 28260574
Abstract (Summary)

In this theoretical dissertation I explore the impacts of the loss of ecological participation across animal species, including human animals. The field of ecopsychology and its applied branch, ecotherapy, focus on healing the relationship between people and the natural world brought on by this loss. However, due to myriad reasons discussed the goals, focus, and effectiveness of these interventions have waned. In drawing from findings in the fields studying the collective symptoms of captive animals and modern trauma theory, this dissertation seeks to refocus ecotherapeutic efforts toward a unified approach to treating a collective and culturally transmitted form of developmental trauma—enculturated captivity. By adopting trans-species psychology as a hermeneutic lens, this dissertation traces the collective pathology first identified by ecopsychology across human and nonhuman animals to highlight and better understand the nature of the enculturated captivity impacting ecological and psychological health in modern techno-industrial society. This dissertation provides new theoretical underpinnings for the development of ecotherapies that treat the cause of enculturated captivity and lead toward collective liberation from this trauma.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Chalquist, Craig
Commitee: Cabot, Zayin, Bradshaw, G. A.
School: California Institute of Integral Studies
Department: East-West Psychology
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 82/6(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Developmental psychology, Ecology, Therapy
Keywords: Developmental trauma, Ecopsychology, Ecotherapy, Intergenerational trauma, Trans-species psychology, Zoochosis
Publication Number: 28260574
ISBN: 9798557037761
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