Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Interactions of Tattoos and Gender on Organizational Fairness and Organizational Citizenship Behavior
by Warren, Elizabeth, Ph.D., Capella University, 2020, 108; 28155416
Abstract (Summary)

As tattoo prevalence grows in the United States, so does the prevalence of tattoos amongst the professional workforce. Prior research has shown negative perceptions of tattooed professionals from customers and coworkers, especially when the tattooed professional identified as female. Existing research does not include the perception of the tattooed professionals nor does it examine the treatment of the tattooed professionals and the effect on their behavior. This study has measured the effect of tattoo visibility and gender on organizational fairness and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). Three research questions were explored in the study. The first research question asked, “When the variable of gender is held constant, will there be significant differences in the average linear variate score where the linear variate is the result of organizational fairness and organizational citizenship behavior?” The second research question asked, “When the variable of tattoo visibility is held constant, will there be significant differences in the average linear variate score where the linear variate is the result of organizational fairness and organizational citizenship behavior?” The third research question asked, “Will there be significant differences in the average linear variate score where the linear variate is the result of organizational fairness and organizational citizenship behavior due to the interaction of tattoo visibility and gender?” The research questions where tested with a 2x4 factorial MANOVA and ANOVA for post hoc review. The population for the study was professionals in the United States employed in an office environment for a minimum of one year. The sample reflects this demographic (N = 128). Participants were grouped based on tattoo prevalence and gender. Interpretation of the analysis revealed a significant variance between tattoo visibility and OCB. A significant variance did not exist between tattoo visibility and organizational fairness, gender and organizational fairness or OCB, or tattoo visibility and gender on organizational fairness or OCB.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Olsen, Brigit
Commitee: Trunk, Barry, Germaine, Jacquelyn, Hughes, Kathleen, Styles, Douglas
School: Capella University
Department: School of Social and Behavioral Sciences
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-A 82/5(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Psychology, Organizational behavior, Organization Theory, Public policy, Gender studies, Labor relations, Business administration
Keywords: AET, OCB, Organizational fairness, Tattoos, Tattoos in the workplace, United States, Professional workforce, Tattooed professionals
Publication Number: 28155416
ISBN: 9798691238673
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