Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Prediction of Attachment Styles, Work Satisfaction, and Work Retention of Licensed Counselors
by Steward, John Odell, Jr., Ph.D., Capella University, 2020, 158; 28149556
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of the study was to answer the following research questions: (a) does intimate relationship anxiety or avoidance scores (measured by the Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised) statistically and significantly predict secure work relationship attachment scores (measured by the Attachments at Work Scale); (b) does intimate relationship anxiety or avoidance scores (measured by the Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised) statistically and significantly predict insecure work relationship attachment scores (measured by the Attachments at Work Scale); (c) does intimate relationship anxiety or avoidance scores (measured by the Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised) statistically and significantly predict work satisfaction scores (measured by the Employee Satisfaction Inventory); and (d) does intimate relationship anxiety or avoidance scores (measured by the Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised) statistically and significantly predict work retention (as measured by the Professional Workers Retention Scale) of Licensed Mental Health Clinicians (LMHCs), Licensed Professional Counselors (LPCs), and Licensed Professional Clinical Counselors (LPCCs) in the Pacific Northwest? Intimate relationship attachment anxiety and avoidance scores have not been researched to determine if they predict secure or insecure work relationship attachment, work satisfaction or work retention. This is the primary gap in the literature the study sought to fill. Quantitative research methods were used to answer the research questions, and linear regression was the method of data analysis. Mental health counselors were the selected participant population for the study, and a nonprobability, purposive sampling method guided participant selection. The research sample was comprised of 144 LPCs, LMHCs, and LPCCs in the Pacific Northwest of America. The described ethnicity of participants was: European Americans (White) 83.00% (n=120), Hispanics 4.86% (n=7), African Americans (Black) 5.56% (n= 8), Native Americans 1.4% (n=2). Females were 76.30% (n=110) of the population. Intimate relationship attachment anxiety and avoidance scores statistically and significantly predicted secure and insecure work relationship attachment scores, work satisfaction scores, and work retention scores; intimate relationship anxiety and avoidance scores accounted for an average of 16% of the variability in the scores of secure or insecure work relationship attachment, work satisfaction, and work retention of LPCs, LMHCs, and LPCCs of the Pacific Northwest. Future research could study the predictive relationship intimate relationship attachment anxiety or avoidance scores, have with scores of secure and insecure work relationship attachment, work satisfaction, and work retention in a mixed method or longitudinal study to explore the relationships between the variables further.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Whiddon, Jana
Commitee: Klepper, Konja, Miller, Kathryn
School: Capella University
Department: School of Counseling and Human Services
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-A 82/4(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Counseling Psychology, Ethnic studies, Mental health, Labor relations, Behavioral psychology
Keywords: Attachment theory, Couples relationship attachment, Intimate relationship attachment, Work relationship attachment, Work retention, Work satisfaction, Relationship anxiety, Pacific Northwest
Publication Number: 28149556
ISBN: 9798684677182
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