Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Impact of Concurrent Enrollment on Latino Male College Engagement: A Mixed Methods Study of Community Cultural Wealth
by Hinkle, Stepheny Michelle, Ed.D., University of Colorado at Denver, 2020, 162; 28029666
Abstract (Summary)

A growing number of Latino male students are attending community colleges each year, accessing higher education opportunities that contribute to personal, academic, professional, and community growth. However, institutionalized norms within education settings can minoritize these same students, and so degree attainment rates remain alarmingly low (National Center for Education Statistics [NCES], 2016b; NCES, 2016c; NCES, 2016d). Concurrent Enrollment (CE) programs at Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSI) are one option that support high school students in college engagement, simultaneously building aspirations of continuing through to degree completion and building the skills needed to navigate through college processes. This mixed methods study examined the impact of CE programs on Latino male students enrolled at two community college HSIs in Colorado, using the Model of Community Cultural Wealth (Yosso, 2005) as a theoretical framework. CE was found to provide a stepping-stone into college, positively impacting GPA, aspirations to go to college and complete a degree, and ability to navigate through college systems.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Hegeman, Diane
Commitee: Mondragon, Sandy, Protas, Brandon
School: University of Colorado at Denver
Department: Leadership for Educational Equity
School Location: United States -- Colorado
Source: DAI-A 82/4(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Higher education, Secondary education, Gender studies, Hispanic American studies
Keywords: Community cultural wealth, Concurrent enrollment, Cultural capital, Hispanic, Latino, Persistence
Publication Number: 28029666
ISBN: 9798684637377
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