Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Campbell’s Chicken Noodle Soup™ and Saltine Crackers: A Milpero’s Autoethnographic Study of Struggle and Success in Life and in Education
by Cantu, Ernesto, Ed.D., The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, 2020, 207; 27999825
Abstract (Summary)

The state of Texas has close to 3,000 colonias, with most of them found along the Texas/Mexico border (“Colonias in Texas,” n.d.) and the most citizens of any state living in colonias. I grew up in a colonia in South Texas called Las Milpas, located in Pharr, Texas. Colonia children are often stigmatized and marginalized. This autoethnographic study is a look into my life as an educator and the social and cultural factors that have contributed to my survival and success. As a child, I lost both my mother and father. I was fortunate that my oldest sister, Margarita “Margie” Garcia, raised me.

Through the use of personal narratives as data, I explored events that have had a significant effect on my own and professional lives. These events have shaped my axiology, what I value, and my ontology, who I am as a person- my state of being. The experiences range from professional to personal, but all have influenced my life as an educator as I worked in the service of others, especially children. Relationships, community, and mentorship have equipped me with the skills and experiences to draw upon as I make decisions that impact children and staff.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Menchaca, Velma, Guajardo, Francisco
Commitee: Guerra, Federico, Garcia, Alejandro
School: The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
Department: Department of Organization and School Leadership
School Location: United States -- Texas
Source: DAI-A 82/3(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational leadership
Keywords: Autoethnography, Colonia, Leadership, Narratives, Personal, Self
Publication Number: 27999825
ISBN: 9798678124463
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