Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Vibrating Antenna Enabled Doppler Radar
by Chordas-Ewell, Nathan, M.S., State University of New York at Buffalo, 2020, 46; 28089869
Abstract (Summary)

This thesis aims to explore the novel methodology of detection and direction finding in radar systems using vibrating antennas or antenna arrays. This method takes advantage of the Doppler effect to gain spatial resolution using conventional radar circuitry by physically vibrating the antenna, and thus inducing a time-varying phase change at the antenna. This is opposed to conventional Doppler radar systems, where the phase change is induced as a consequence of the target's movement.

By tightly controlling this vibrational speed, pattern, and amplitude of the antenna, the factors limiting spatial resolution and scanning range are transferred onto the digital baseband circuitry, such as the analog to digital converter's (ADC) sampling rate, sampling time, as well as the overall noise of the system. In addition, as there is no beam steering required in this method, multiple targets can be simultaneously detected over the antenna or antenna array's beam pattern.

As a proof of concept, a vibrating antenna based radar using a homodyne radar and single antenna is designed, fabricated, and tested using a single, as well as multiple targets. Although this system verifies the potential uses and efficacy of the proposed approach, further discussion is also included to examine the potential integration of this system into larger two-dimensional scanning systems to reduce the cost, size, and potentially weight of comparable radar systems.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Choi, Jun H.
Commitee: Fam, Adly
School: State University of New York at Buffalo
Department: Electrical Engineering
School Location: United States -- New York
Source: MAI 82/3(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Electrical engineering, Engineering
Keywords: Doppler, radar
Publication Number: 28089869
ISBN: 9798672197791
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