Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Flexible Electronics Encapsulation in Thin Polyester Films
by Limkaichong, Justin Sy, M.S.Eng., University of Massachusetts Lowell, 2020, 121; 28029231
Abstract (Summary)

An encapsulation method using a compression molding machine with a silicone cushion was used to encapsulate flexible electronic devices with polyester films. A transient thermal analysis was created to anticipate the thermal behavior of the proposed process providing guidance towards optimal processing condition. Experimental validation of the process settings and the deformation of the material was performed. Results showed that sheet thinning and strain was heavily influenced by a combination of temperature and compressive stress, along with the presence of devices inserted into the assembled sandwich. Tuning of the processing conditions, together with the addition of spacers, created a more uniform and even sheet thickness with beneficial pressure distributions, thus reducing the amount of film deformation and applied stress to the inserted devices.

These observations on squeeze and polymer flow directly translated into the bond strength of the lamination of the encapsulating layer. Utilizing healing models with characterized material viscosity, the lamination percentage was approximated. Correlating the healing models with observed peel strength indicated that the degree of lamination is directly affected by the amount of healing of the polymer encapsulant, but adversely affected by the presence of devices that could cause pressure variations.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Kazmer, David
Commitee: Budhlall, Bridgette, Mead, Joey
School: University of Massachusetts Lowell
Department: Plastics Engineering
School Location: United States -- Massachusetts
Source: MAI 82/3(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Plastics, Engineering
Keywords: Compression molding, Encapsulation, Flexible electronics, Polyester, Polyimide, Thin films
Publication Number: 28029231
ISBN: 9798664795530
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