Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Effects of Feedback Content and Preference on Performance
by Schalla, Alexander Clark, M.S., University of Missouri - Columbia, 2019, 47; 22587502
Abstract (Summary)

Data were collected on individual task completion and feedback procedures and stimuli used to change performance in existing feedback interventions. The information collected aimed to improve the quality of feedback delivered to direct care staff at a clinic specializing in the treatment of autism and neurodevelopmental disorders. A feedback stimulus preference assessment (FSPA) was administered to identify preferred feedback components commonly used in feedback interventions. Preference assessment data collection consisted of a paired choice and ranking procedure on feedback components including content, modality, recipients, and immediacy. Feedback delivery was altered and delivered based on preference to improve task completion rates (i.e., performance). Performance was based on a checklist of session-related duties direct care staff were required to complete during client appointments. Results from this study indicate that preferred and detailed, behavior-specific, affirmative feedback may be effective at improving rates if individual task completion.

Keywords: affirmative feedback, corrective feedback, feedback intervention, performance feedback, performance management, task completion

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Clay, Casey J.
Commitee: O'Connor, Karen V., Brooks, Constance M.
School: University of Missouri - Columbia
Department: Special Education
School Location: United States -- Missouri
Source: MAI 82/3(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Behavioral Sciences, Occupational psychology, Medical personnel, Behavioral psychology
Keywords: affirmative feedback, corrective feedback, feedback intervention, performance feedback, performance management, task completion
Publication Number: 22587502
ISBN: 9798664792034
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