Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

California's Efforts to Mitigate Significant Disproportionality of African American Students in Special Education
by Harrison, Brett, Ed.Sp., California State University, Long Beach, 2020, 92; 27834342
Abstract (Summary)

Disproportionality of African American students in special education is a component of current racial injustices. African American youth are often assessed for and inappropriately identified as a student with a disability at higher rates than other ethnic and racial groups. California Department of Education enlisted the State Performance Plan Technical Assistance Project (SPP-TAP) to support local educational agencies (LEAs) identified for having significant overrepresentation of African American students within special education. In this study, five LEAs identified as significantly disproportionate in California were examined. The degree of adherence to research-based strategies in LEAs’ improvement plans was examined. LEAs’ improvement plans were also qualitatively analyzed based on a Critical Race Theory framework. Rates of disproportionality across 4 years were examined. LEAs’ improvement plans were rated highest on focus areas for intervention and lowest in evaluating these efforts, and four LEAs decreased rates of disproportionality. Implications for LEAs’ practices to curb rates of disproportionality of African American students in special education in California are then discussed.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Hagans, Kristi
Commitee: Powers, Kristin, Leonard, Alex
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Advanced Studies in Education and Counseling
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 82/3(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Special education, African American Studies, Educational administration
Keywords: California, Critical Race Theory, Disproportionality, Overrepresentation, Significant disproportionality, Special education
Publication Number: 27834342
ISBN: 9798664789928
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