Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

You Take Selfies Like a Girl! Sexism in the Sandlot of Athlete Social Media
by Blevins, Anastasia Ellice, M.S., California State University, Long Beach, 2020, 82; 27831119
Abstract (Summary)

Using Objectification Theory as a framework, the current study examined if participants value appearance or capability of female and male athletes via social media images. A total of 116 participants were randomly assigned to view and describe typical Instagram photos from either the female athlete group or male athlete group, after completing demographic measures. Self-objectification (SO) and athlete objectification (AO) scores were calculated as a ratio of objectifying words to physical capability-based words used to describe themselves and athletes, respectively. Athlete objectification was not significant between conditions, suggesting that female and male athletes are objectified similarly. However, female athletes were described more negatively/critically than male athletes. Additionally, SO and AO were correlated in the whole sample, but were stronger in the female athlete group. These findings indicate that objectification and criticism placed upon female athletes is very pervasive, and audiences are more likely to objectify female athletes if they objectify themselves.

This work was supported by the Kinesiology Department at California State University, Long Beach under the Graduate Research Fund Award [number GF001].

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Ede, Alison
Commitee: Madrigal, Leilani, Vargas, Tiffanye
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Kinesiology
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 82/2(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Kinesiology, Psychology, Sociology, Gender studies
Keywords: Social media images, Sport, Athletic images, Perceptions, Judgement
Publication Number: 27831119
ISBN: 9798664723991
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