Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Quasi-Experimental Study: Perceived Attitude Toward Dogs, Dog Breed/Size and Public Accommodation
by Sloan, Kimberly K., Psy.D., Capella University, 2020, 158; 28089345
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this research was to determine if service dog breed, dog size, or a small business employee’s attitude toward dogs impacts their likelihood of public accommodation. Federal law prohibits businesses from denying service dogs access to their public areas and service; however, access denial events continue to occur, necessitating this quantitative, quasi-experimental study to determine if significant differences in the average scores of public accommodation are based on different types of dog breed/size and attitude toward dogs. An online survey collected responses from 164 small business employees aged 22 to 73. Analysis of variance findings indicated that both dog breed/size and employee attitude toward dogs were significant. The post-hoc analysis using the Games-Howell procedure indicated that participants who liked dogs, tended toward higher public accommodation scores across small, medium, and large dogs. However, participants who disliked dogs were more likely to accommodate small dogs compared to medium or large dogs. Therefore, personal preferences determined accommodation, with preference given to small dogs over medium and large dogs. Recommendations, study limitations, and future research opportunities were also discussed.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Estey, Alisa
Commitee: Pitselos, John, Frese, Kent
School: Capella University
Department: Harold Abel School of Psychology
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-A 82/2(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Disability studies, Commerce-Business, Behavioral psychology
Keywords: Service dogs, Dog breed, Public accommodation, Attitudes
Publication Number: 28089345
ISBN: 9798664752878
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