Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Image of Archetypal Dismemberment: Myth, Art, and Immigration
by Matthews, Pierson K., Ph.D., Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2019, 268; 28029706
Abstract (Summary)

The problem of mythological, cultural, physical, social, and psychological dismemberment is explored within the context of the collective unconscious, the past and present cultural milieu, and particular artists works. This research focused on how the archetype of dismemberment was manifested in the World War I era and again now in the current era of globalization and mass immigration. The analysis of the works of the particular visual and literary artists I focused on revealed many common themes such as shame, meaninglessness, alienation, loneliness, and violence. Another prominent recurrent theme was the challenge of balancing isolation with community. Shame was such a dominant common theme that it seemed appropriate to name our current era the “Age of Shame.” Ours is an era of intensified social divisions that leads to a radical lack of any toleration of differences. Indeed, Eli Sagan thinks that we have regressed to the level of archaic cultures that had zero tolerance for differences. Refugees and economic migrants have become the latest victims of unjust discrimination and intolerance. These are clearly evidences of social dismemberment. The study calls on depth psychologists to help us articulate the dangers of archetypal scapegoating in a culture like ours that is so rooted in violence and human sacrifice.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Downing, Christine
Commitee: Pye, Lori, Hayes, Jackie
School: Pacifica Graduate Institute
Department: Depth Psychology with Emphasis in Jungian and Archetypal Studies
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 82/1(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: European history, Clinical psychology
Keywords: Eli Sagan, Depth psychology, Refugees, Scapegoats, Shame, Violence
Publication Number: 28029706
ISBN: 9798662488427
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