Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

A Psychological Theory of Being “Out-Here”: Broad-Based Organizing, Transformative Education, and Relational Empowerment
by Chananiah, Pesach, Ph.D., Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2019, 209; 28029646
Abstract (Summary)

This dissertation uses an autoethnographic, participatory action research approach to consider James Hillman’s 1992 call for therapy to be a “cell of revolution,” rather than a response to the pathological or disadvantaged—“a kind of building of doorways, opening conduits, and making channels” (Hillman & Ventura, 1992, p. 208). Through case studies in a broad-based organizing initiative and transformative education program, and phenomenological interviews with participants of both, this study explores what a relational approach to empowerment makes available for community psychology. It asks: what modes of praxis from the case studies can contribute to a psychology at the level of organization or community which is both preventive and liberatory? In addition to theory around empowerment and relational self, Paulo Freire’s concepts of conscientização and dialogic pedagogy provide a framework for viewing the processes and concepts involved. These case studies inform a model of applied community psychology which links inner freedom and power with freedom and power in the world, through relational methodologies, and resulting in an understanding of being “out-here.”

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Stevens, Maurice
Commitee: Kipnis, Aaron, Avila, Maria
School: Pacifica Graduate Institute
Department: Depth Psychology with Emphasis in Community Psychology, Liberation Psychology, & Ecopsychology
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 82/1(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social research, Organization Theory, Educational psychology
Keywords: Empowerment, Landmark worldwide, Liberatory pedagogy, Organizing, Participatory action research
Publication Number: 28029646
ISBN: 9798662487888
Copyright © 2020 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest