Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

A Qualitative Study of the Lived Experiences of Obese African American Women
by Carswell, Lisa M., D.S.W., Aurora University, 2020, 122; 27837171
Abstract (Summary)

The obesity epidemic is a rapidly growing problem in the African American community. Specifically, obesity is destroying the health of African American women. Yet, some African American women are not aware that carrying extra weight affects their overall health. This study examined the histories of trauma through the lens of African American women. Data was collected from 30 African American women in the Chicagoland area. Using a qualitative phenomenological research design allowed for a better understanding of the experiences of African American women who live with obesity. The participants were recruited utilizing purposive sampling. The researcher collected data using one-on-one, face to face, in-depth, semi-structured interviews. The participants completed the Adverse Childhood Experience Questionnaire, which allowed the participants to recall past trauma and added rich data to the study. Data Analysis consisted of identify seven major themes, elucidating the essence of the lived experience of the women and their perceptions of the relationship between trauma and obesity. The major themes were health awareness, consequences, neglect, abuse, domestic violence, attachment, and coping mechanisms. Results showed there is a strong relationship between an unhealthy BMI and past trauma. The study also discussed the theoretical and practical implications of the findings.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Bruhn, Christina
Commitee: Agostinone, Faith, Fraizer-Tucker, Arletta
School: Aurora University
Department: Social Work
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: DAI-A 82/1(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social work, African American Studies, Psychology
Keywords: African American, Obesity, Trauma
Publication Number: 27837171
ISBN: 9798662448179
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