Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Working with Parents in Psychodynamic Child Psychotherapy
by Sisk, David A., Ph.D., Institute for Clinical Social Work (Chicago), 2020, 232; 28022624
Abstract (Summary)

This social-constructivist grounded theory study explored how psychodynamically oriented child psychotherapists conceptualize and conduct their work with parents of children in treatment. The sample consisted of 16 psychodynamic clinicians, each having between 7–40 years of post-graduate clinical experience with children and families. Each clinician was interviewed once for 45–90 minutes about the nature of their clinical work with parents and their conceptualizations of the theoretical and experiential background for their approaches. This study found that parent-work is an essential component of child treatment and is best conducted by being individualized on a case-by-case basis. The individualization of parent work is informed by a thorough assessment of parents, through which clinicians make a personalized definition of the focused target of treatment. This is further aided by a deep knowledge and awareness of both child and parent development, particularly an understanding of parenthood as a developmental phase. As a general approach, parent-work in psychodynamic child psychotherapy is focused on supporting the child’s development, working with the parental aspect of the parent and treating the parent-child relationship.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: DiLeonardi, Joan
Commitee: Faigen, Woody, Berger, Barbara, Greenberg, Madelyn, Blumhardt, Kerstin
School: Institute for Clinical Social Work (Chicago)
Department: Clinical Social Work
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: DAI-A 82/1(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social work
Keywords: Parent work, Parent-child relationship, Parental development, Parental therapy, Parenthood as a developmental phase, Working with parents
Publication Number: 28022624
ISBN: 9798662419469
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