COMING SOON! PQDT Open is getting a new home!

ProQuest Open Access Dissertations & Theses will remain freely available as part of a new and enhanced search experience at www.proquest.com.

Questions? Please refer to this FAQ.

Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Baroque in Games: A Case Study of Remediation
by Thornton, Stephanie E., M.A., San Jose State University, 2020, 101; 27994922
Abstract (Summary)

This thesis presents a case study for the remediation of baroque painting by some contemporary video games. Video games such as Horizon Zero Dawn borrow illusionistic techniques, the motif of the labyrinth, and the use of the total work of art as presented in certain baroque paintings. These characteristics are modified and represented within the new medium in an effort to heighten immediacy and create an immersive experience for the audience. This thesis discusses the process of remediation in detail and then analyzes how video games—and Horizon Zero Dawn in particular—remediate illusionistic techniques like linear and atmospheric perspective. Then, the analysis focuses on the remediation of the baroque labyrinth. Finally, the thesis analyzes the total work of art present in this case study of baroque painting and video games and how the former media improved upon the latter. Within the context of this case study, this thesis finds that certain video games borrow illusionistic techniques, the labyrinth motif, and the total work of art from baroque painting and repurpose these aspects in the new medium.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Bowen, Dore
Commitee: Raynsford, Anthony, Simonson, Anne, Junkerman, Christy
School: San Jose State University
Department: Art History
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 82/1(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Art history
Keywords: Baroque, Horizon zero dawn, Neobaroque, Pietro da cortona, Video games, Videogames
Publication Number: 27994922
ISBN: 9798662401716
Copyright © 2021 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest