Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Theatre, Infectious Disease, and the 20th Century: A Critical and Historical Examination of Three Representative Plays
by Winter, M. C., M.A., University of Nebraska at Omaha, 2020, 70; 27837832
Abstract (Summary)

Twentieth century America was the site for many pandemic infectious diseases, including influenza, syphilis, and HIV/AIDS. As the federal government and citizens alike worked to combat these diseases, theatre artists of the day produced work that reflected the concerns and sensibilities of their communities in response to these public health threats. By examining these plays in the context of the diseases they address, a more complete picture of theatrical reactions to public health crises can be catalogued. This paper turns a critical and dramaturgical eye to Alice Rostetter’s The Widow’s Veil in the context of the 1918 influenza pandemic, Arnold Sundgaard’s Spirochete in the context of American Surgeon General Thomas Parran’s campaign for the eradication of syphilis, and Steven Dietz’s Lonely Planet in the context of later years of the AIDS crisis in America proper, in order to better explore the effect of pandemic infectious disease on the theatrical output of twentieth century American playwrights.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Zank, Ronald J
Commitee: Melby Phaneuf, Cindy, Falconer Al-Hindi, Karen
School: University of Nebraska at Omaha
Department: Theatre
School Location: United States -- Nebraska
Source: MAI 82/1(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Theater, Theater History
Keywords: Influenza, Syphilis, HIV/AIDS, Rostetter, Alice, Sundgaards, Arnold, Dietz, Steven, 1918 flu pandemic
Publication Number: 27837832
ISBN: 9798662408708
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