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Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

High-Impact Practices Support Second-Year Students' Academic Success, Engagement and Persistence
by Cavazos-Eichelberger, Melissa, Ed.D., Northern Illinois University, 2020, 127; 27743600
Abstract (Summary)

This study examined the perceptions of ten second-year students who participated in the Success Program at Midwestern four-year university. As part of the Success Program, these participants also participated in several high impact practices (HIPs) throughout their first year. Participants in this study shared their perceptions on the benefits of HIPs, how HIPs improved their academic success and engagement, making them want to persist, and any barriers they experienced, prohibiting their participation in HIPs. Findings indicated students perceived HIPs (a) enhanced academic success, (b) increased community engagement, (c) improved the likelihood of their persistence, and (d) that targeted HIPs should be offered during their second year. Students also perceived a time and other obligations were barriers to participating in HIPs. Finding from this study contribute to the field of research targeting second-year students. It raises awareness for the need of targeted support to second-year students as they navigate through the sophomore slump.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Jaekel, Kathryn
Commitee: Hu, Xiaodan, Peska, Scott
School: Northern Illinois University
Department: Counseling and Higher Education
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: DAI-A 81/12(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Higher education, Education Policy
Keywords: High impact practices, Persistence, Qualitative research, Second-year students, Sense of belonging, Sophomore slump
Publication Number: 27743600
ISBN: 9798662345812
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