Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Impact of Anger-Coping Behaviors on Cardiovascular Events among African American Males
by Christian, Rudell, D.P.H., University of Illinois at Chicago, Health Sciences Center, School of Public Health, 2010, 140; 28000267
Abstract (Summary)

In a retrospective analysis of Atherosclerotic Risk in Communities study data, Spielberger Trait Anger scores were used to determine whether biopsychosocial stress anger-coping strategies influenced myocardial infarction and stroke incidence rates in 15,792 adults aged 45–64, and whether these differences varied by race. Participants were identified at recruiting sites in North Carolina, Minnesota, Maryland, and Mississippi within the United States. Participants underwent baseline screenings and three subsequent examinations at 3-year intervals. Spielberger Trait Anger scores 11–19 proved significant among African American males in the myocardial infarction/Spielberger Trait Anger/race comparison (OR = 5.195 CI = 2.430-11.106, P = 0.000). African American male participants with Spielberger Trait Anger scores 20–29 were 5.556 times more likely to have a myocardial infarction than those with Spielberger Trait Anger scores < 10 (OR = 5.556, CI = 2.170–14.225, P = 0.000). Least resilient African American male participants with Spielberger Trait Anger scores 30–40 were 3.571 times more likely to have a myocardial infarction than participants with Spielberger Trait Anger scores < 10 (OR = 3.571, CI = 1.634–7.804, P = 0.001). While the magnitude of impact differed, the greatest increases were seen in the two moderately resilient groups. While the least resilient group saw an increased number of myocardial infarctions in the combined analysis noted above, these differences were less pronounced than in the moderately resilient groups. This could be indicative of a danger inherent with having an unclear response pattern, when faced with daily biopsychosocial stress.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Mensah, Edward K.
Commitee: Croke, Kevin G., Freeman, Vincent L.
School: University of Illinois at Chicago, Health Sciences Center, School of Public Health
Department: Public Health
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: DAI-A 82/1(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Psychology, Mental health, Gender studies, Public health, African American Studies
Keywords: African American male, Black male, Anger management, Cardiovascular Medicine/Heart Disease, Epidemiology, Resilience, Stress-coping
Publication Number: 28000267
ISBN: 9798662398573
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