Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Effects of Feeling Safe on Gut-Brain Disorders
by Hamilton, Mary Elizabeth Skyler, Ph.D., Regent University, 2020, 108; 27993883
Abstract (Summary)

Functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID) is one of the most common gastrointestinal diseases globally and a burden on health care resources. A biopsychosocial model has been developed to explain the pathogenesis of FGID, which emphasizes the importance of psychological factors in the development of FGID. Sufficient evidence has accumulated to support the efficacy of hypnotic interventions for pain, irritable bowel syndrome, and FGID. These interventions have focused on increasing sensation of relaxation and suggestions for improved bowel function and pain reduction. Recent advances in the understanding of the autonomic nervous system have identified that optimization of health promoting parasympathetic activity is dependent on the experience of safety. As the experience of safety and its related neuroception has been associated with activation of the ventral vagal complex and its positive impact on gastric activity and pain modulation, it was predicted that abdominal pain and gastrointestinal symptoms would decrease. The results of this study confirmed this prediction and demonstrated a decrease in abdominal pain and bowel symptoms characteristic of IBS. Through visual analytics depicting changes in reported pain and process measures of Safety, Relaxation Positive Affects, the data revealed that hypnotic intervention for promotion of a sense of safety was associated with symptom reduction and predicted changes in process measures.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Sells, James
Commitee: Tophoven, Ingo, Damis, Louis
School: Regent University
Department: School of Psychology & Counseling
School Location: United States -- Virginia
Source: DAI-B 81/12(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Psychobiology, Counseling Psychology, Experimental psychology
Keywords: Clinical hypnosis, Feelings of safety, Functional gastrointestinal disorder, Somatic symptoms
Publication Number: 27993883
ISBN: 9798641553658
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