Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Anxiety and Exhaustion: How Workplace Surface Acting Impacts Parenting
by Heffernan, Haley, M.A., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2020, 78; 27957338
Abstract (Summary)

As the workforce continues to expand and diversify, more and more individuals face the stress of balancing their roles in both the work and nonwork domain. As such, many individuals now balance both a work role and a parenting role. Research examining how individuals’ roles conflict is vast and ever-growing, especially when examining how a work role may spill over into nonwork domains and impact a parenting role. However, there is an apparent lack of research examining how parents whose work roles involve emotional labor can impact their role as a parent. To help bridge this gap in the literature, 80 participants who identified as full-time employees with preschool – aged children in emotional labor industries, were recruited and completed an online questionnaire. Mediation analyses found surface acting is related to the perceived quality of the parent-child relationship through sequential mediation. Overall, analyses supported that the relationship between parents’ surface acting and the perceived quality of their parent-child relationship was sequentially mediated by parents’ job-related anxiety, job-related exhaustion, and the perceived quality of their parent-child interactions. Opportunities for additional research, implications, and study limitations are also discussed.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Daus, Catherine
Commitee: Bartels, Lynn, Voyles, Elora
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 81/12(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Psychology, Occupational psychology, Individual & family studies
Keywords: Anxiety , Exhaustion, Workplace surface acting , Parenting
Publication Number: 27957338
ISBN: 9798645498443
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