Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Chemometrics in Monitoring Spatial and Temporal Variations in Drinking Water
by Daube, Olivia, M.S., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2020, 96; 27957807
Abstract (Summary)

Corrosion in drinking water systems is a common source of toxic metals in water. Specifically, exposure to lead and copper from corrosion can cause detrimental effects to human health. To assess what is in the local drinking water, samples from several municipal systems in the St. Louis metropolitan area were collected regularly over a three-year period. The drinking water samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry for twenty-five elements. Bulk property experiments were also performed including pH, conductivity, alkalinity, and phosphate concentration. The data revealed transient conditions that exceeded Environmental Protection Agency limits for copper and lead at locations that did not have a history of violations. Evaluation by principal component analysis (PCA) offered insight into the cause of the excessive copper and lead levels. The presence of missing measurements in the data set required imputation of missing data values to complete PCA. The effect of imputation on the PCA results was compared to analysis with a limited data set, and also compared to other PCA algorithms. The ability of partial least squares (PLS) analysis to predict elemental composition from limited analysis was assessed. PLS provides a way to predict measurements of future drinking water samples.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Navarre, Edward
Commitee: Tucker, Kevin, Voss, Eric
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Chemistry
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 81/12(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Chemistry
Keywords: Chemometrics, Drinking water, Monitoring spatial, Temporal variations
Publication Number: 27957807
ISBN: 9798645498214
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