Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Growth of Choice: What Kinds of Posttraumatic Growth Do Prospective Survivors of Trauma Prefer?
by Alfaro, Gabriel, M.A., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2020, 45; 27957006
Abstract (Summary)

Posttraumatic growth (PTG), or the positive changes that occur after an individual goes through a trauma, is a field of study that has drawn much attention from positive psychologists, medical professionals, and other sources over its relatively brief time in the literature (Tedeschi & Calhoun, 1996; Coyne & Tennen, 2010). However, due to methodological problems associated with many of the studies conducted on PTG, there remain many questions about what constitutes genuine growth following a trauma, or if trauma is even necessary to stimulate growth (Jayawickreme & Blackie, 2014; Roepke, 2013). As such, understanding if there are preferences for growth following a traumatic event and potential personality factors that could predict these preferences could be a valuable addition to the literature. This study sought to understand what a sample of people, some of whom are potentially survivors of trauma, understand and prefer when it comes to positive changes that can happen after a traumatic event. The results indicate that, while there was no clear preference for change following a trauma, there were personality predictors for specific categories of growth. Future studies can investigate more specific group differences and potential use alternate measures of growth to broaden the field’s findings.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Pomerantz, Andrew
Commitee: Pawlow, Laura, Segrist, Dan
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 81/12(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Clinical psychology, Personality psychology
Keywords: Exploratory, Growth, Optimism, Personality, PTG, Trauma
Publication Number: 27957006
ISBN: 9798645483371
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