Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Proletariat in Higher Education: An Introduction of Contingent Faculty as the Precarious Class
by Barrone, Janet Teresa, Ed.D., Northern Arizona University, 2020, 155; 27743387
Abstract (Summary)

THE PROLETARIAT IN HIGHER EDUCATION: AN INTRODUCTION OF CONTINGENT FACULTY AS THE PRECARIOUS CLASS

This study outlines the plight of the precariat within academia. Defined as a social class formed by people whose economic existence occurs without long-term predictability or security, the precariat has been seen as being in employment positions that breed inequality. Surveying faculty members from a large western university using the established Poverty and Employment Precarity in Southern Ontario (PEPSO) survey and Index, it was to be determined if a contingent faculty member’s everyday employment conditions differed from their low-educated, low-paid counterparts who could be identified as being part of the ‘gig’ economy. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze the extent and the nature of the differences between both researched groups to determine if employment precarity has any bearing on an individual’s economic, social, and familial circumstances. This identified methodology was then positioned in with motivation theory.

Even though all of those surveyed fit the definition of being employed outside of a standard employment relationship (SER), the majority of university contingent faculty members felt comfortable enough within their positions where they not only had a high level of commitment to the college for continued ongoing future employment, they felt that the college mirrored their commitments as well. In conclusion, it was determined that measuring insecurity requires a much deeper analysis than simply looking at the form of a person’s employment relationship.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Dereshiwsky, Mary
Commitee: Davidson, Frank, Schwanenberger, Michael, van der Mars, Hans
School: Northern Arizona University
Department: Educational Leadership
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-A 81/11(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Higher education, Economics, Educational sociology
Keywords: Contingency, Employment security, Equity, Precarity, Wellness
Publication Number: 27743387
ISBN: 9798645467302
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