Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

#whoamI? Hyperconnectivity and Female Identity Development in Adolescence
by Wicks, Caitlin, Psy.D., California Institute of Integral Studies, 2020, 193; 27959781
Abstract (Summary)

This dissertation explores the ways in which female adolescent developmental patterns may be undergoing a significant change due to the ubiquity of hyperconnectivity. Today’s adolescent girls are developing identities in a world where their social lives revolve around digital events and exchanges that take place on smart phones in their back pockets. The historical context for adolescent development has shifted and adolescent girls are using the new tools at hand—quite literally, to navigate the challenges of adolescent development. The dissertation uncovers the unique and specific ways that individual teenage girls use social media as they navigate the complex transition from childhood to adulthood that is adolescence.

This dissertation’s literature review explores the history of theories of adolescent development through feminist perspectives of this important process in human development. The methods section describes the ways in which research will be conducted and data will be analyzed. A narrative research analysis is used in this qualitative research project in order to achieve a holistic individual perspective from adolescent girls themselves to best understand how social media and hyperconnectivity is assimilating in to developing adolescent girls’ daily lives.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Chow, Lani
Commitee: Bersing, Doris
School: California Institute of Integral Studies
Department: Clinical Psychology
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-B 81/11(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Clinical psychology
Keywords: Adolescence, Development, Female, Hyperconnectivity, Identity, Social media
Publication Number: 27959781
ISBN: 9798645446765
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