Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Increasing Perceived Organizational Support: Can Integrated Succession Plans Help?
by Romanoff, Adira R., M.A., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2020, 80; 27735768
Abstract (Summary)

Successions in the workplace are common and can be coupled with fear and feelings of unease. These fears and disruptions can be lessened through the implementation and use of succession plans. There are many positive outcomes for employees and organizations when succession planning is implemented, and this research aimed to identify an additional positive outcome in the form of a work attitude called perceived organizational support (POS). This study explored the relationship between succession planning and POS, including three potential moderating variables: type of organization (nonprofit versus for-profit); organizational size, and employee’s knowledge of succession plan. It was hypothesized that more integrated succession plans would lead to greater POS and that this relationship would be stronger in nonprofit organizations, larger organizations, and when employees had more knowledge about the succession plan. The hypotheses were examined through a survey design with a sample of 96 participants from Amazon’s Mechanical Turk and word-of-mouth. Results suggest that more integrated succession plans do play a role in shaping employee POS. There were no significant moderating effects for the three tested moderators. Future research, theoretical and practical implications are included.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Daus, Catherine S
Commitee: Bartels, Lynn K, Nadler, Joel T
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 81/11(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Organizational behavior
Keywords: Perceived organizational support, Succession, Succession plan
Publication Number: 27735768
ISBN: 9798645443177
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