Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

An Analysis of the Impact of the Community Schools Strategy on the Reading and Mathematics Tudent Achievement of Elementary School Students in a High Poverty School District
by Desaque, Khaleel S., Ed.D., Shippensburg University, 2018, 99; 13422929
Abstract (Summary)

Public schools serving high numbers of students in poverty regularly seek innovative ways to support the academic needs of these children. The Community Schools Strategy has re-emerged as a popular schoolwide intervention allowing educators to partner with a myriad of stakeholders to meet the students’ academic and nonacademic challenges. The Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 also has focused on the Community Schools Strategy as a way to improve student achievement within high poverty schools which underperform on federal and/or state accountability measures. This study examined the impact the Community Schools Strategy had on reading and mathematics achievement within a three-year period among elementary school students in one high poverty school district. Student achievement within schools utilizing the Community Schools Strategy was compared to the student achievement within schools not utilizing that strategy. Results suggested, in this case, student achievement within schools using a traditional school model was higher than that found in schools using a community school model .

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Fowler, Gerald
Commitee: Bateman, David, Wright, Tiffany
School: Shippensburg University
Department: Educational Leadership and Special Education
School Location: United States -- Pennsylvania
Source: DAI-A 81/11(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational evaluation, Elementary education
Keywords: Achievement gap, Community school, Community schools strategy, Poverty, Student achievement, Wrap-around services
Publication Number: 13422929
ISBN: 9798644903283
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