Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Breaking the Cycle of Intergenerational Poverty by Teaching Biblically Based Financial Literacy Classes to Urban Youth in Plainfield, New Jersey
by Thomas McClain, Vivian, D.Min., New Brunswick Theological Seminary, 2020, 130; 27835296
Abstract (Summary)

This study explored generational poverty, the causes and theories on poverty, anti-poverty initiatives, and the possibility of breaking the cycle of generational poverty through teaching urban youth a Biblically based financial literacy curriculum. The study focused on youth living in an impoverished city where twenty-one percent of the population live in poverty. Using a combination of applied research and participatory action research the children participated in a five-week Biblically based financial literacy course. It found that the participants dependency on parental or guardians had a significant influence on the outcome of the future success of the program. This study asserts that the cycle of poverty can be broken in impoverished families when financial skills are taught to the children of the poor. Although structural conditions persist individual actions can make a profound difference in the children’s self-awareness, their decisions, and application of financial knowledge. Further research would be required to prove a decrease in generational poverty could be obtained through a combination of structural and individual change.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Sinclair, Laura
Commitee: Ashley, Sr, Willard W C, Wymer, Andrew
School: New Brunswick Theological Seminary
Department: Ministry Studies
School Location: United States -- New Jersey
Source: DAI-A 81/10(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Education finance, Theology, Individual & family studies
Keywords: Biblically based, Education, Finance, Financial literacy, Poverty, Urban youth
Publication Number: 27835296
ISBN: 9798641783000
Copyright © 2020 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest