Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Toward a Theory of Early Trust in Intelligent Systems: Exploring Psychological Factors and Cognitive Processes
by Elson, Joel Scott, Ph.D., University of Nebraska at Omaha, 2019, 246; 27664143
Abstract (Summary)

Advances in artificial intelligence promise a future of computing that will transform the relationship between human and machine from tool to collaborative partner. These intelligent systems will augment human expertise, amplify human intelligence, enhance productivity, and improve decision-making. Trust in these systems is essential in order to collaborate effectively and to fully realize their advantages; early trust in particular has been identified as a key predictor of reliance and system use. Research on trust development in information systems has focused primarily on system characteristics and technical capabilities; considerably less attention has been given to understanding the role of human factors such as individual differences and personality traits. This dissertation uses a series of experiments and a field study involving a Fortune 500 company to explore the relationship between human personality traits and early trust in novel intelligent systems. Dual process theories of cognition and trait activation theory are applied to better understand the relationships that are observed. Together, these studies are the first steps toward a comprehensive model combining individual, system, and situational factors that influence early trust in an intelligent system.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Derrick, Douglas C, Ligon, Ginamarie S
Commitee: Ward, Kerry, Schuetzler, Ryan, Lundmark, Leif
School: University of Nebraska at Omaha
Department: Information Technology
School Location: United States -- Nebraska
Source: DAI-B 81/9(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Information Technology
Keywords: Cognition, Intelligent system, Personality, Trust
Publication Number: 27664143
ISBN: 9781658464826
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