Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Stress Overload and the New Nightmare for Dreamers
by Velasco, Sarah Elena, M.A., California State University, Long Beach, 2020, 47; 27735614
Abstract (Summary)

Undocumented immigrants experience a greater number of stressors than documented immigrants, citizens, and other ethnic minorities; therefore, they may be at an increased risk for experiencing stress overload. Research has shown stress overload to be positively correlated with somatic and psychosomatic symptoms and negatively correlated with academic performance. The present study investigated whether Dreamers, undocumented beneficiaries of DACA, indeed experienced more stress overload than their peers, and if this negatively affected their health and grades. Measures of stress overload (Stress Overload Scale-Short), health (Patient Health Questionnaire-15), academic outcomes (GPA), citizenship status and other demographics were administered online to approximately 400 students at a large public university. An independent samples t-test analysis revealed that Dreamer students experienced significantly higher stress overload, more illness symptoms, and lower GPAs compared to Citizen students. A regression analysis revealed that stress overload partially mediated the relationship between Dreamer status and illness symptoms and wholly mediated the relationship with academic outcomes. These findings help shed light on the experiences of Dreamer students, with implications for understanding the psychological costs of recent changes to immigration policies.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Amirkhan, James
Commitee: Gonzalez, Araceli, Sawatzky, Misty
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 81/9(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Psychology
Keywords: College students, DACA, Dreamers, Grades, Health, Stress
Publication Number: 27735614
ISBN: 9781658443647
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