Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Role of Emotion in White Racial Justice Activism in the United States
by Shultz, Danny, M.A., California State University, Long Beach, 2019, 74; 27547349
Abstract (Summary)

White emotional reactions in response to race-related issues is a well-documented area of inquiry. Research in this area typically attends to how these emotional reactions hinder white affiliation with racial justice activism by distancing white communities from their role in maintaining systems of racism. This thesis examines an under-studied area within the social psychology of emotion: the role of emotion in white racial justice activism in the United States. This qualitative thematic analysis of 14 in-depth interviews with white racial justice scholar-activists focuses on (1) what emotions are experienced, recalled, and leveraged in white racial justice activism, and (2) how white participation in racial justice activism is affected by emotion. Analyses draw from affect theory to discuss the intersections of whiteness, racial justice activism, and emotion by closely examining how surprise and humanization of self and other affect white experiences of de-ideologization that occur while participating in racial justice activism. Implications for both theory and practical applications are discussed.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Kohfeldt, Danielle
Commitee: Ahrens, Courtney, Correa, Maricela, Majzler, Robert
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 81/8(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social psychology, Personality psychology
Keywords: Affect theory, Emotion, Racism, Social activism, Whiteness
Publication Number: 27547349
ISBN: 9781658420693
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