Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Predicting Summer Melt among Urban Disadvantaged Students
by Winn, Colleen M., Ed.D., Rivier University, 2019, 173; 27671873
Abstract (Summary)

In the United States, there is an increasing stratification of educational opportunities for the rich and the poor. Low-income, First Generation (LIFG) urban minority high school graduates are at risk of not enrolling in college in the fall after high school graduation. The failure to enroll in college after high school graduation despite students’ intent to enroll is called “summer melt”. Higher socioeconomic students are outpacing their lower income peers for enrolling in college after receiving a high school diploma. There is an increasing population of disadvantaged youth. The demand for college graduates needed to fill the nation’s jobs is urgent. Demographically low-income, first generation students are more likely to come from minority backgrounds (Engle & Tinto, 2008). Seven major barriers to postsecondary non-enrollment increase the likelihood that at risk students will not enroll in college. The study employed a quantitative correlational design to determine the barriers for postsecondary non-enrollment for underserved urban high school seniors. The binomial logistic regression revealed that three non academic variables fear of failure and aversiveness to task (related to procrastination), and family and peer pressure were statistically significant in predicting the likelihood of a student experiencing summer melt

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Gleason, John
Commitee: Mousseau, Angela, Walrath, Robert
School: Rivier University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- New Hampshire
Source: DAI-A 81/7(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Higher education, Educational sociology
Keywords: Disadvantaged students, First generation, Postsecondary education, Summer melt, Urban high schools
Publication Number: 27671873
ISBN: 9781392496343
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