Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Jewish Musical Identity in Exile: Arnold Schoenberg's Works and Fragments on Jewish Themes, 1937-1951.
by Grayson, Joshua M, Ph.D., University of Southern California, 2017, 171; 11016386
Abstract (Summary)

Arnold Schoenberg's choral works composed after his 1933 exile from Germany demonstrate key aspects of Jewish identity the composer experienced while residing in America. Kol Nidre (1937), A Survivor from Warsaw (1947), Dreimal Tausend Jahre (1949), and the incomplete ""Israel Exists Again"" (1949) together represent Schoenberg's evolving political and ethnic attitudes towards his Jewish identity during those years. This identity was represented in several manifestations: as liturgical awareness, as group identification, and as political ideal. Schoenberg's Jewish identification evolved significantly during his time in America. Beginning with a stance embodying ardent nationalist advocacy, following closely on the heels of intense political writings expressing ardent aspirations, Schoenberg softened considerably in later years. By the time he wrote his final compositions, he had moved from a nationalist to an ethnic conception of Judaism. His final works demonstrate a shift in his conception of Jewish sovereignty from one based on Jewish exceptionalism to one derived from universal principles of human rights.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Brown, Bruce
Commitee:
School: University of Southern California
Department: Historical Musicology
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 79-06(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Music
Keywords: 1937, 1951, Arnold, Exile, Fragments, Identity, Jewish, Musical, S, Schoenberg, Themes, Works
Publication Number: 11016386
ISBN: 9798662396463
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