Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Student Perceptions on the Effectiveness of Co-teaching: Do Students Perceive Co-teaching to Be Beneficial?
by Caprio, Caitlin, M.A., Trinity Christian College, 2019, 60; 13881001
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of the study was to determine whether students perceive co-teaching to be an effective strategy to use within their educational learning environment. In order to accomplish this, a mixed methods design was utilized. For the quantitative research, twenty-three 6th grade students participated in a survey. For the survey students were asked to rate their beliefs regarding the single taught and co-taught setting. The results from each setting were compared to determine which setting students deemed more effective in regards to the level of support, engagement, and overall preference. For the qualitative research, four participants partook in an interview in order to seek more in depth information regarding student perceptions of the strengths and weaknesses of the co-taught setting. Upon comparing the results from the two portions of the survey (single taught vs. co-taught), it became evident that students rated more statements relating to the co-taught setting with agree than the single taught setting. For the interview, the participants were able to identify a plethora of strengths relating to the co-taught setting and were not able to identify any weaknesses relating to the setting. Lastly, all four participants were able to identify that they would prefer a day of all co-taught classes vs. all single taught classes.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Kelly, Amy, Harkema, Rebecca
Commitee: Baillie, Sara, Meyer, Joy
School: Trinity Christian College
Department: Special Education
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 81/4(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Education
Keywords: Co-Teaching, Effectiveness, Student Perceptions
Publication Number: 13881001
ISBN: 9781392772102
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